Blog Archives

Film Challenges Perception of Palestinians

By Fedwa Wazwaz, Engage Minnesota

Palestine: Why the Caged Dove Sings
Thursday, July 13th at 7 pm
Film Society of Minneapolis
St. Paul’s Screen #3 at St. Anthony Main Theatre

filmOfficially, the narrative around Palestinians is they want to destroy Israel and hate Jews, and if one searches hard enough, one finds some voices expressing such views.

However, the situation is not about feelings or views of people, but about boundaries and a justice denied.

Palestine: Why the Caged Dove Sings is set for a premiere screening today.  The film allows people on the ground to speak about their pains and everyday struggles.

Sabry Wazwaz is a Palestinian-American activist, who created the film in his travels back to Palestine in 2014.  He interviewed and documented the reality of Israeli occupation in candid easy going conversations with people on the ground.

Wazwaz was inspired by documentaries like Five Broken Cameras. He wanted US citizens to see what is really going on in Palestine and felt that he could use his camera as a way to expand understanding. The film includes powerful interviews and demonstrates how Zionism is not Judaism.

Wazwaz explains, “I wanted to show people, mainly the American people, the difference between Zionism and Judaism. Zionism is the blueprint behind Israel’s apartheid policies towards the Palestinian Arab Christian and Muslim populations. It is no different than apartheid in South Africa and segregation here in the U.S. It was wrong then and it is wrong now. No people should be living under different laws based on their religion, race, gender, etc. All people should be living under same laws and have equal rights.”

Admission is $10. Proceeds will support the Anti-War Committee.

Fedwa Wazwaz is a Palestinian-American born in Jerusalem, Palestine and raised in the US.  She was the chair for the Interfaith Relations at Islamic Center of Minnesota.  She has completed training in restorative justice at the University’s Center for Restorative Justice and Peacemaking.  She was a 2008-2009 policy fellow at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs.  She is a public speaker and writer and lives in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota.

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Educating Muslim Students in Minnesota: The Skill and the Will

By Martha Bigelow, Meeting Minnesota’s Muslims

Multicultural education seeks to include a range of perspectives often suppressed by the majority culture as well as include students from diverse backgrounds in the process of learning.  What is sometimes lost in efforts to create inclusive educational experiences is serious thought to how to welcome students of minority religions.  In the case of Muslim students, the barriers typically include lack of knowledge of Islam and strategies to accommodate Islamic religious practices in school settings.  In the same way it is essential to have classrooms that make students of different ethnicities, genders or family income levels feel invested in learning, it is equally essential to make Muslim students feel that they belong to the learning community. Like all students, we need to keep Muslim kids engaged in school because of the importance of high school diploma for so many post-secondary options students wish to explore.

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Oct. 8 Event in Minneapolis: Lebanon’s Tragedy

Wednesday, Oct. 8th, 6:30 p.m.: Cathy Sultan speaks about her new book Tragedy in South Lebanon at Amazon/True Colors Bookstore, 4755 Chicago Ave. South, Minneapolis

The war in Iraq has taken our attention away from other troubled areas of the Middle East. Cathy Sultan draws us back to Lebanon and Israel in Tragedy in South Lebanon, which was released in April. Through history, research, and personal interviews, she chronicles life in southern Lebanon and northern Israel during the brutal summer 2006 war. As in her other critically acclaimed books, Sultan focuses on ordinary people, who are overlooked by politicians and military leaders and become victims of poor decisions made by the governments of Israel, Lebanon, and the United States.

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Eid Mubarak (Blessed Eid)

By Fedwa Wazwaz

EID MUBARAK (BLESSED EID)

EID MUBARAK (BLESSED EID)

Eid ul-Adha, or Festival of Sacrifice is one of the major Muslim holidays.  It comes right after a pillar of Islam called the Hajj or pilgrimage.  The Hajj commemorates the life and trials of Prophet Abraham’s family, upon them peace and blessings.  Once in a lifetime, every adult Muslim who ahs the physical and financial ability is required to make a pilgrimage to teh holy city of Makkah, home of the Ka’bah, which Muslims believe was built by Abraham and his son Ishmael.
The Hajj pilgrimage is an extremely communal event as over two million Muslims, men and women of varied ethniticies and nationalities, dressed in simple white clothing symbolizing the equality of all people, perform identical rituals.

 

Eid ul-Adha celebrations are similar to Eid ul-Fitr with the addition of sacrificing a lamb, goat or cow to commemorate Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his sone, Ishmael, who Muslims believe was miraculously replaced by a lamb, similar to the Biblical story.  People share the meat of the sacrified animal with the poor and needy, relatives and friends.
The day begins with a special congregational prayer followed by a short sermon.  People are dressed in their best clothing, and children traditionally receive new clothing as well as other gifts.  Food, holiday congratulations, and festivities such as rides, balloons, and other fun activities for children follow the prayers.  The holiday lasts for four days during which people usually visit or invite each other.
We wish everyone in all places at all times a blessed Eid Mubarak. May Allah accept your good deeds and all your efforts during the blessed month of Dhul Hijjah. 
IT’S TIME FOR EID

Inside Look at Ramadan/CAIR Annual Ramadan Dinner

Kashif Saroya, board member of the Minnesota chapter of the Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR-MN) was on Fox9 this early Saturday morning discussing Ramadan. To view the Fox9 program click here.

Later tonight is their 2nd Annual Ramadan Dinner. The program this year is titled, “American Muslims: Partners for Peace and Justice.” Speakers include: Mohamed Dini, Ibrahim Hooper, and Congressman Keith Ellison.

The program will include a tribute to the late Imam W.D. Mohammed. John L. Esposito, professor of religion, international affairs and Islamic studies at Georgetown University said of Muhammad: “W.D. Mohammed became a prominent figure in inter-religious affairs. He was the first Muslim to give an invocation in the U.S. Senate and in 1993, he offered the prayer during the first Inaugural Interfaith Prayer Service of President Bill Clinton. On September 11, as Americans commemorate the attacks and tragedy of 9/11, Warith Deen Mohammed will be buried. His passing and the memory of his accomplishments are a witness and fittingly a reminder of the heart of Islam and the vast majority of its followers.” Click here for the whole article.
 
Where:
Banquet Hall, New Brighton Community Center
400 10th Street NW, New Brighton, 55112

Cost: 
Tickets are $10/person.

All are welcome to attend. On-site babysitting will be available for young children and basketball and other games available for older children.

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