Become CPR Certified

By Fedwa Wazwaz, Engage Minnesota

When my daughter and her classmates became my instructors, I learned how to do CPR and received free lessons in humility.

cpr
Monday, November 6th, 2017, I received a text message from my daughter reminding me of the CPR training today at her high school.  She is part of a program for First Responders which trains students in Opportunities in Emergency Care.

While I agreed to become CPR certified, she along with her classmates were getting their certification for becoming CPR instructors.

I actually forgot about the training but was glad I had no other plans to cancel.  The training was very informative.

We learned how to do chest compressions on an adult, child, and infant in case of a cardiac arrest.  We got to practice a few times, including how to use an AED, a medical device used to deliver shocks between cycles of chest compressions.  It was an informative and busy night.

I got to meet some of her teachers as well as other parents.  I highly recommend the program for students entering high school, especially young girls as they also give instructions in self-defense.

One teacher stopped by to discuss my daughter with me, and she told me how she loves Maryam’s genuineness, laughter, and down to earth spirit.  We chatted for awhile and it turned out she works also at the University of Minnesota like me.  Small world.  We decided to meet for lunch one day on campus and continue the conversation.

Then the skills test came and the instructor was someone my daughter’s age.  He was very friendly and kind as we went through three sets of skills testing.  He gave me the sheet which showed I passed.  I was pretty excited and took a picture with my daughter and her other classmate.

As we left the school, my daughter reminded me that I only got CPR certified, and only received basic training, while she has more advanced training in CPR and is a CPR instructor now.  I smiled at her “I am ahead of you mom” attitude.  In some ways, we are worlds apart, and in other ways, we are so much alike.

While the training we received was in basic CPR, I believe receiving training from my daughter and her classmates also gave us free lessons in humility.

Fedwa Wazwaz is a Palestinian-American born in Jerusalem, Palestine and raised in the US.  She was the chair of the Interfaith Relations at Islamic Center of Minnesota.  She has completed training in restorative justice at the University’s Center for Restorative Justice and Peacemaking.  She was a 2008-2009 policy fellow at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs.  She is a public speaker and writer and lives in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota.

WANT TO ADD YOUR VOICE?
If you like this piece, share it on social media.  We invite you to join us in this project on our social media sites.  We welcome your voice to the Comment section below — or consider writing a commentary, podcast or photo story. (For more information, email engageminnesota@gmail.com.)

© Copyright 2005-2017.  Fedwa Wazwaz, All rights reserved.

About engagemn

A Voice for Minnesotan Muslims

Posted on November 7, 2017, in Engage Minnesota, Fedwa Wazwaz and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: