Category Archives: Engage Minnesota

Beyond shame, violence, and terror

By Fedwa Wazwaz, Engage Minnesota

One form of social-control shaming has been the humiliation of Muslims in an attempt to get us to transform into something “more American,” more comfortable, and more familiar.

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Faith, as I’ve said before, is about accepting ourselves as humans and turning to God to help us grow, heal, and be nurtured. This isn’t possible if we feel ashamed of who we are, of our core identities.

Oppressors—who are often themselves suffering from unacknowledged shame—don’t fight us just physically, but also psychologically.

The path to faith and healing is the path to knowing yourself. The more you know yourself, the harder it is for you to be recruited against another person.

When we talk about shame, we often think of public reprimand.  Yet, that is the least destructive of shaming as you know who is doing the shaming and can respond. For example, President Donald Trump’s shaming is faced with strong responses by many groups.  The worst of shaming is the insidious and hidden type which leaves a person or group conflicted of their perception of reality and undermines one’s ability to respond.

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Adopt refugees, children, & families fleeing war to make worlds of difference

By Omar Alansari-Kreger, Engage Minnesota

Rather than focusing on simply raising awareness on the pain and suffering of persons displaced by war, why not take one step further? What if families across Minnesota were encouraged to adopt refugees and displaced persons from around the world as their own?

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Look around the Twin Cities and you will find highway billboards with pictures featuring sad-looking dogs. An appeal is made to the inner humanitarian in us all to act on an injustice. The world is becoming an inferno with no end to the madness. In Syria, Aleppo was recently recaptured by forces loyal to a tyrannical war criminal, yet we continue to stand idle as atrocities unfold on our newsfeeds. Women, children, and the elderly made a last chance escape out of Aleppo hoping to find sanctuary in neighboring Turkey. The sad truth is that a great deal of Syrian civilians will never make it to safe ground under an unrelenting clout of civil war. Here is a proposition we should all consider, what if those highway billboard signs began featuring the tearful faces of Syrian children in addition to other war-battered peoples? On the surface, the main idea would be directed toward raising awareness generally.

Nowadays, it is all too easy to block out a world of sad, but inconvenient truths. We have the ability to remove, block out, and unsubscribe from trends that are unsettling to us. That is nothing but selective attention which desensitizes us to a reality of ominous truths. Rather than focusing on simply raising awareness on the pain and suffering of persons displaced by war, why not take one step further? What if families across Minnesota were encouraged to adopt refugees and displaced persons from around the world as their own? Does such a proposition carry too much controversial baggage? It is all too sensible to argue that human lives are invaluable; therefore, society should mirror that all too universal standard. There are many different ways to adopt refugees and displaced persons fleeing war zones. There is the traditional method of direct adoption; this is where one child or family is brought into the United States through programs of state-sanctioned sponsorship.

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Localizing the rule of law to end Syria’s civil war

By Omar Alansari-Kreger, Engage Minnesota

Here is a proposition well worth considering: what if a moderate majority rebellion unified around a cause based on universal respect for the rule of law?

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What is the best way to achieve a practical peace in a seemingly endless conflict? The Syrian Civil War continues unabated with no hindrances. The more information obtained, the more perplexing its reality. In Syria, each faction has paramilitaries that allege loyalty to a sectarian cause. Alliances are made with foes in order to marginalize a common enemy for tactical gain; hence, the battle lines are always changing. The carnage of Syria’s Civil War has proven one thing: there are no winners, only losers. Assad’s regime claims to be waging a war against foreign terrorism. Its campaign is best rendered as one of wonton repression that accepts nothing but unquestioned loyalty to the regime. There will never be a lasting peace under policies of state-sponsored terrorism. Torture combined with a longing for retribution is preserved by a thirst for revenge; both are timeless and destructive.

As an outsider looking into the Pandora’s Box of the Syrian Civil War, I cannot help but to feel overwhelmed by the plethora of informational resources that compete over its portrayal. It seems that each source is fighting its own war of legitimacy only to leave an observer lost and disillusioned with the facts as they are. Complexity is achieved through the diversity of opinions. It becomes highly unfathomable to imagine a world without either.  A man can make an opinion just as opinions make men, but are opinions alone truly indicative of intelligence, impartiality, and reason? Each perspective that has covered the Syrian Civil War is exclusively motivated by its own narrative.

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Refugees, an undeniable element of the American dream

By Omar Alansari-Kreger, Engage Minnesota

It seems rather reasonable to argue the United States owes the millions of people it has displaced, directly or indirectly, amnesty through a program of refugee resettlement.

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Wherever there are immigrants, there are refugees. The United States is a nation of immigrants, but is it also a nation of refugees? The Puritans were one of the earliest European settlers that arrived in the New World. They fled the Old World to escape bigotry and persecution for their beliefs. They found solace at Plymouth Rock because it offered a place free of bigoted persecution. Therefore, would that make the Puritans America’s first major batch of refugees? At the time, issues surrounding the drama of immigration were not there because as a nation, the United States was nonexistent.

It cannot be stressed enough. The United States is a nation built on the bedrock of immigration. It can be argued that every major wave of immigrants were the refugees of their time. They escaped subsistence by means of serfdom. The foundation of the nation is supported by the promise of providence; a staple of the American Dream. The United States is a grand experiment ceaselessly working toward its optimization. It is the civic responsibility of every generation to impartially define the American Dream. Each definition can be used as an existential nuance to repatriate its foundations to the present.

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Boycotts are a form of free speech

By Nigel Parry, Engage Minnesota

“Boycotts are a form of free political expression and free speech. They are a peaceful way of making your voice heard in a situation where no one is listening.”

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Dear Representatives Bud Nornes and Chris Swedzinski,

The HF 400 Israel Boycott Bill you have introduced is a bizarre piece of legislation, actually forcing Minnesotans to support a state that routinely and grossly defies international humanitarian law, and which is conducting the longest military occupation in history.

I lived in the Palestinian West Bank for 4 years before I came to America in 1998, and let me tell you it is a shameful thing to live in a country in which you regularly get to see children gunned down (always outside of stone throwing range, i.e. no self-defence excuse is valid), massive bombardments and displacements of already battered civilian populations, and straight-up racist land theft.

Israel’s parliament most recently voted to legalize the confiscation of Palestinian homes to give them to Israeli Jews. This level of naked racism is the opposite of what America stands for.

Trump’s current Muslim ban affects 213 million people in the seven listed countries. That’s without counting the people from those countries who live amongst us, now scared to leave the country in case they can’t return.

The Statue of Liberty is weeping as you turn away people trying to flee from war. You don’t target entire races or religions or ethno-nationalist populations to fight terror. That is obviously going to have the opposite effect.

The United States itself boycotts several regimes, and not only boycotts, but actually has sanctions against other countries, e.g Iran. The only reason that Apartheid was banished from South Africa was because of boycotts. That’s why the US itself boycotts and sanctions countries—because it works.

Boycotts are a form of free political expression and free speech. They are a peaceful way of making your voice heard in a situation where no one is listening. What you are proposing is nothing less than Minnesotan state control of Minnesotan people’s consciences. This is the opposite of what any state or federal body should be doing. It is utterly contrary to the First Amendment.

Instead of writing laws to pander to a foreign regime that cares nothing about international law or human life, perhaps you could instead remind the Israel lobbyists that urged you to pass this absolutely shameful and embarrassing piece of legislation to actually make peace with the Palestinians.

Of course, you must be aware that Israel has all the power in this situation, with the fifth most powerful army in the world, an army utterly free of moral constraint, and merrily funded to the tune of $3.2 billion a year of US taxpayers’ dollars, about to increase to $3.8 billion annually. It’s a first world country folks, it doesn’t need any charity, let alone that giant military basket of death it regularly dips into. Israel isn’t threatened. It is the threat. You have this entirely backwards.

All you do when you silence people, with measures like this, is encourage them to stop talking and start fighting. Blessed are the peacemakers, not the war mongers, nor those who pander to oppressive regimes.

Your responsibility is to the people of Minnesota first. Stop pandering to Israel, remove this Constitution-defying legislation from the table, and act to reign in the Frankenstein monster we have done so much to create.

Sincerely,

Nigel Parry can be reached via https://www.linkedin.com/in/nigelparrydesign

There is a hearing on criminalizing BDS.  Contact your Representatives:
Date: Feb. 14 at 1 p.m. Tuesday,
Place: Senate Building, 95 University AVE W, 55155

Senate File 247: “Israel Boycott”
This is the Senate Committee on State Government Finance and Policy and Elections.

Committee Chair Mary Kiffmeyer, R, District #30, representing Big Lake, Elk River, Otsego.
Mark Koran, R, #32, Cambridge, Isanti, Lindstrom, Rush City
Jim Carlson, DFL, #51, Eagan
John Jasinski, R, #24, Faribault, Owatonna
Susan Kent, DFL, Woodbury, southern Maplewood
Carolyn Laine, DFL, #41, Columbia Heights, Fridley, St. Anthony
Carla Nelson, R, #26, Rochester
Scott Newman, R, #18, Hutchinson, Glencoe, Litchfield
Ann Rest, DFL, #45, New Hope, Cyrstal, Robbinsdale, Golden Valley, Plymouth
Torrey Westrom, R, #12, Morris, Sauk Centre, Gleenwood, Breckenridge

 

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If you like this piece, share it on social media.  We invite you to join us in this project on our social media sites.  We welcome your voice to the Comment section below — or consider writing a commentary, podcast or photo story. (For more information, email engageminnesota@gmail.com.)

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Guilt, remorse, and getting beyond the self-help placebo

By Fedwa Wazwaz, Engage Minnesota

“O God! Grant us enough fear (of displeasing Thee) that it may serve as a barrier between us and our sins. . .and grant us enough faith that it may help us to face the misfortunes of this world easily.”
–Prayer of Prophet Muhammad, upon him peace and blessings.

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It’s important to distinguish between two very different emotional processes: guilt and remorse.

We sometimes think of the two as interchangeable, but in truth they are very different. Guilt is connected with control, obligation, and fear. When you’re feeling guilty, you’re being shamed and disempowered. At times, this shame can be personal, part of a private controlling force. But often, guilt is part of a broad societal shaming.

For instance, Muslims have been pressured, for the past sixteen years, to feel guilty for the horrific events of September 11, 2001, as well as other violent attacks. We’ve been put on the guilt-track, where we need to constantly excuse, explain, apologize, and apologize for a crime that took us by surprise as it did everybody else.

Indeed, this guilt denied American Muslims the space to grieve. We, too, needed to share with the rest of the community the process of loss. We, too, needed to work through our sorrow and fear.

Instead, we were roped by a feeling of guilt and shame, and a burden to prove that we were not guilty. But in this case, there is nothing we can do to prove we’re not guilty. Still, the president’s executive order evokes September 11 when suddenly revoking permanent residents’ access to their homes, jobs, and lives.

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Meet Hend Al Mansour

By Hend Al Mansour, Green Card Voices

“I found that in America, I could blend in. There’s a history of immigration, there are people like me here.”

When Hend Al-Mansour was diagnosed with cancer, she realized that life was too short to leave one’s dream unfulfilled.From an early age, Ms. Al-Mansour pursued a passion for art but was aware of her limitations in terms of freedom as a Saudi Arabian woman. She decided to heed her parents and become a doctor. During her medical career, Hend had been growing more and more dissatisfied with the lack of women’s rights in Saudi Arabia and began to contemplate moving.In 1997, Ms. Al-Mansour seized the opportunity to move to the United States through a fellowship at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. During a medical exam, it was discovered that she had cancer. Having such a life-changing experience, Hend decided to become a full-time artist after completing her fellowship.Today, Hend’s work references identity and gender politics in Arab society and in Islamic teaching while her style pays homage to Arabic and Islamic art forms. She has participated in regional, national and international art shows. Hend co-founded the group Arab Artists in The Twin Cities and was a member of the Arab American Cultural Institute in Minnesota. Ms. Al-Mansour lives in St. Paul, Minnesota with her husband.

Tea Rozman Clark, has a Ph.D. in Oral History.  She is the Executive Director of Green Card Voices and a 2015-17 Bush Leadership Fellow.  Green Card Voices is sharing the stories of the nation’s 40 million immigrants through their website WWW.GREENCARDVOICES.ORG

Educate:  If you are a teacher we encourage you to use their resources!

Host a Touring Photo Exhibition: If you are interested in having a photo exhibition at your location or organization, please contact Tea at: info@greencardvoices.com.

Share Your Story:  Green Card Voices are touring the country looking for compelling stories to tell about immigrants from all walks of life. If you are interested in sharing your story through their website, please introduce yourself to them so we may contact you about upcoming opportunities.

WANT TO ADD YOUR VOICE?
If you like this piece, share it on social media.  We invite you to join us in this project on our social media sites.  We welcome your voice to the Comment section below — or consider writing a commentary, podcast or photo story. (For more information, email engageminnesota@gmail.com.)

The African-American Women Behind the Heroes

By Jimmy Jones, Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR)

Yet neither of these men could have soared to the heights that they did without the passionate, persistent, consistent, and competent help of women who just happened to be African-American.

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For African-Americans, the annual time period between Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday on January 15th and the end of February is bittersweet. This is because we hear quite a bit about Dr. King’s legacy and the importance of Black History for about six weeks, only to be shunted aside again on March 1st of every year.

Nevertheless, we rightly remember Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as a genuine American hero. So was recently departed astronaut and senator John Glenn, the first American in space.

Yet neither of these men could have soared to the heights that they did without the passionate, persistent, consistent, and competent help of women who just happened to be African-American.

In John Glenn’s case, the full story of these women was finally told in the book “Hidden Figures,” written by Margot Lee Shetterly and released as a Hollywood film with the same title.

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Academia, a World of Rude Awakenings

By Omar Alansari-Kreger, Engage Minnesota

Is the core curriculum offered at colleges and universities changing so much as to necessitate an aggressive rise in annual academic tuition?.

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During an interview on Errol Morris’s First Person, Christopher Langan, a man reported to have the world’s highest IQ at over 200, described academia to be a cold and heartless bureaucracy. “A breeding ground for parrots,” he exclaimed! Year-by-year, tuition continues to skyrocket with no end in sight. According to statistics collected from the website collegedata.com, the annual cost of private college tuition in 2016 stood at an average of $32,405. For state residents enrolled at public universities, the average cost was marked at $9,410 annually. Finally, for out of state residents attending public universities, the total cost for one year’s worth of education approached $23,894. Such figures are rather overwhelming which leads to a critical objection which arrives in the form of a question: how does academia justify the soaring cost of academic tuition? Is the core curriculum offered at colleges and universities changing so much as to necessitate an aggressive rise in annual academic tuition?

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It’s not just conservatives. We’re all being duped by “fake news”

By Hani Hamdan, Engage Minnesota

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Media is now more about manipulation than ever before.

The buzz these days is about fake news and how it apparently had a role in the election of Donald Trump. I worry, however, that a portrayal of fake news as being somehow proprietary to conservative websites is misleading, if not disingenuous.

Minorities, including Muslims, have been subjected to a barrage of hair-raising news warning that white people are basically out to get them. Every single incident involving racist remarks, letters, attacks, graffiti, salutes, conferences, flags, posters, or associations is amplified to the tenth degree by people who cannot care less about minorities.

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Jesus in the Bible, Jesus in the Qu’ran

By Fedwa Wazwaz, Engage Minnesota

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Jesus appears differently in Christianity and in Islam. Yet between the two, Jesus is a point of connectivity: His teachings and his life story are important in both the Bible and the Qur’an.

For me, as a Muslim, the teachings of Jesus remind me of the central importance of vulnerability. Jesus was born into a marginalized community during the rule of the powerful, patriarchal Roman Empire. He had no father to protect him. And it wasn’t just the agents of the Roman Empire who opposed Jesus’s works. His own community was often against him. So Jesus faced many forces that wanted to silence him.

Against all these forces, we’re told, young Jesus had only his mother Mary to defend him.

Prophet Muhammad, peace and blessings upon him, underlined the link between himself and Jesus: “Both in this world and in the Hereafter, I am the nearest of all the people to Jesus, the son of Mary, peace and blessings upon him. The prophets are paternal brothers; their mothers are different, but their religion is one.”

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What is—and isn’t—bravery?

By Fedwa Wazwaz, Engage Minnesota

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The David and Goliath story is used by people around the world as a structure and a storyline to help them understand their own actions. The story has a wide appeal: It’s empowering for any of us to see ourselves as a small, unlikely “David” figure fighting against a behemoth of a “Goliath.” After all, justice was on David’s side, while Goliath had brute force and worldly power. And David won.

This story has been adapted to the purposes of people across many political and religious spectra. Ultra-right-wing commentators have called themselves Davids against a Goliath entity of the mainstream media; ISIS fighters paint themselves as a David against the Goliath of the United States military might. There have been heroic David-figures as well. Nelson Mandela has been called a David against the South African apartheid regime’s Goliath. Or a small whistleblower standing up to corporate corruption might also be called a David.

It’s an easy story to fall back on. As important and appealing as it is, when read simply the story can blind us to criticism, allowing us to see ourselves as a tiny hero against powerful aggressors.

But what was David’s story, really?

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Embracing altruism beyond pessimism

By Omar Alansari-Kreger, Engage Minnesota

The reality is that it only takes a relatively minor concentration of altruism to effectuate a world of difference.

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It’s all too normal to feel like the smallest person in the world after watching the evening news. No matter what resource we use to obtain knowledge about the outside world, we often walk away with a sick feeling in our stomachs. That is especially true of a world overridden with unprecedented strife and hardship. To the average lower middle-class citizen, there is a million dollar question that runs through the mind: do I have the power to change anything? We often rebuke the world by dismissing it outright. When a concerned citizen gives up on the prospect of a better world, hope is replaced by shallow pessimisms. The fact of the matter is that no price can be paid to the experiential pain and suffering of the human condition. The rationalization of an atrocity is often weighted in its material cost. It is naively presumed that the only resource required is a bottomless void of money to make anything possible. The reality is that resources alone do not effectuate changes in an otherwise adverse world; that is especially true of money.

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When is it time for forgiveness?

By Fedwa Wazwaz, Engage Minnesota

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When we see people oppressed, trampled on, violated, and their loved ones murdered, “forgiveness” is one of the first words that often comes to hand. There are thousands of memes and stories that urge people to forgive. Indeed, popular wisdom informs people that the anger they carry is only damaging to them. Offload it, we’re told, and everything will be fine.

Forgiveness can be a positive force, of that there’s no doubt. But we must distinguish between a harmful “instant forgiveness” and a helpful, spiritually satisfying “sustainable forgiveness.”

Real, sustainable forgiveness rarely comes quickly, and it cannot be forced, compelled, or coerced. A sustainable forgiveness certainly isn’t about quickly offloading anger, which often forces victims to deny their reality –putting them in the same position that they were in when they were first victimized.

Indeed, there are many steps on the path toward sustainable forgiveness. This kind of forgiveness doesn’t emerge straight away from victimization, and it certainly doesn’t ascribe to “forgive and forget!”

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Meet Salman Kirmani

By Salman Kirmani, Green Card Voices

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“Even if people did not know where I was from, they respected who I was; they respected I was different. Their respect was a very endearing thing for me and defined that this is the community I want to live in. This is the community I want my kids to grow up in.”

As a medical student. Dr. Kirmani was loyal to his community in Pakistan. And although his training led him to Minnesota, he believed he would return to assist and comfort the elders in his community back home.

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Let your fear of God be embedded with love

This is an excerpt from a forthcoming book, currently titled Reflections of Faith: Lessons from the Prophets.By Fedwa Wazwaz, Engage Minnesota

O God! I ask You for Your Love, the love of those who love You, and deeds which will cause me to attain Your Love.
–Prophet Muhammad, upon peace and blessings.

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How Do We Fear God?

When some people think of “fearing God,” they imagine God as a fearsome torturer. This “God” is a towering, vindictive being who is just waiting for them to make a mistake.

In fact, it’s the reverse. The God who we fear is patient and loving. This God gives us opportunity after opportunity to repent, feel remorse, change our habits, and grow. Punishment comes into the picture only when it becomes evident to God, and to everyone around, that an individual is not receptive to growth.

Indeed, God gives us many opportunities to see our actions through other eyes. Pharaoh was surrounded not just by the slaves who he dehumanized and oppressed, but he also had people of light and goodness in his own home. These were people who he respected: namely Asiya, his wife, and her adopted son Moses.

Pharaoh also had a pious, wise advisor, and there were others in his kingdom who tried to steer him toward a better way, to the intertwined love and fear of God. But none of these good people were able to have an impact on Pharaoh. His arrogance and narcissism were simply too deep-seated.

So, yes, God is loving, merciful, compassionate, and patient. Yet this cannot be all. Because there also comes a time for justice.

We shouldn’t fear God because we believe that God is vindictive. God doesn’t care only about a select elite—God is compassionate and cares about everyone. So, instead, we fear God because God is majestic. This majesty should bring about not our quavering, but our humility. It should help us to authentically know our own limitations.  

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Unity, an Unfortunate Deficit of Minnesota Muslims

By Omar Alansari-Kreger, Engage Minnesota

Great efforts have been made and initiatives launched, but how successful have such undertakings been in marshaling a greater Muslim identity across the Twin Cities?

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We all have day jobs. It is a fact of life. In order to survive, one must work to sustain a living. We sacrifice a great deal for our day jobs. A great proportion of our true identity is misplaced only to be frozen on the sidelines. As a professional that specializes in caring for the elderly and developmentally challenged, there is one crucial fact of life I take home each day: the best things in life are free. Sundays are special to people that grew up under the Judeo-Christian tradition. They share a great reverence for their communities. In their company, I have noticed a unique willingness to share the burden of the communal blunt when faced with hardships.

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Loyalty & cooperation are two-way streets

By Fedwa Wazwaz, Engage Minnesota

Most of your sins are because of your tongues.
–Prophet Muhammad, upon peace and blessings.

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There are frequent calls—from law-enforcement officials, from radio personalities, and from ordinary people—for Muslims in the United States to be “loyal.” It’s not new. The loyalty of many other groups has been questioned: Japanese, Catholics. But what does it mean to be a loyal citizen of the United States, and how can loyalty be fostered?

Loyalty doesn’t mean that you agree to every action taken by your country’s government. As a US citizen, I have some criticism of US foreign policy. But loyalty does mean that I will address this in the public square. I will raise my questions not to attack America, but in a way that will benefit the country. When you’re speaking up as a loyal citizen, you’re speaking openly—you’re not plotting and planning in the shadows.

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Meet Ruhel Islam

By Tea Rozman-Clark, Green Card Voices

The best way to respond to extreme vetting, a term presidential candidate Donald Trump refers to in the debates is to amplify the voices of Muslim immigrants in their own words.

Upon the request of his sister, who was moving to the U.S. with her American-businessman husband, and due to the hostile political climate of his home country, Mr. Islam left Bangladesh for the U.S. in 1996.

The fourth of seven children, he moved from his rural, childhood village of Sylhet to a larger urban area in pursuit of a college degree in commerce and accounting. Upon the completion of his degree and while still in Bangladesh, he started a farm – growing it from just two chickens to over two thousand.

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A Science Library for North Minneapolis

By Omar Alansari-Kreger, Engage Minnesota

An eager intellect is a prospect of hope. It scoffs at the predetermined odds and looks to a world of what could be.

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Behind every great community, there is an intellectual center. Youths entertain grand imaginations that tempt the known boundaries. An adult reality is bland. It is defined by the monotony of routine. Gradually, we misplace our hopes and curiosities for complacency and acceptance. An ominous gatekeeper rules over each boundary with little to no empathy. A person is labeled as expendable and is rapidly dispensed with. Will our resolve be sincere to our youths? What happens when youths are cut down and put in their “respective places” in society? Will hopeful dreams and ambitions be rendered illusory once such an ominous reality comes to pass? The need for a science library may seem abundantly extraneous to many. If we budgeted enough tax revenue for a billion dollar football stadium, why is a science library for less than a quarter of a million dollars unconscionable to us? It then becomes pertinent to ask ourselves an existential question: as a society, where are our priorities?

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