Blog Archives

Minnesotans and Iraqis Work Together for Reconciliation

By Luke Wilcox

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Iraq can seem far from Minnesota, both geographically and culturally. While nearly six years of military operations in Iraq have brought images of war and its consequences into American homes, the culture and people of Iraq have rarely followed. Many Americans support peace with Iraq, but know little about Iraqis and wonder how much impact one person can realistically have in a violent world. For a group of Minnesotans and Iraqis, the answer is, “more than you think.” For the Iraqi and American Reconciliation Project (IARP) and the Muslim Peacemaker Teams (MPT), interpersonal and local community connections – rather than strategic agreements between national governments – are exactly what is needed to sustain an enduring process of reconciliation and peacebuilding. Read the rest of this entry

Peaceful Tomorrows Statement on the 7th Anniversary of 9/11

“…we never wanted wars of retaliation that would cause the deaths of innocent civilians in other nations.”

By September 11th Families for Peaceful Tomorrows

Peaceful Tomorrows Statement on the 7th Anniversary of 9/11.

Letter via Email
The experience of yet another anniversary of 9/11 provides an occasion to reflect upon the hopes and beliefs that brought the members of September 11th Families for Peaceful Tomorrows together. In response to the terrorist attacks that killed our family members, we never wanted wars of retaliation that would cause the deaths of innocent civilians in other nations. We never wanted hunger for revenge to lead America to violate international law, abandon Constitutional rights, or engage in torture.

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Ready for real change?

By Elias Karmi

According to a survey published recently by the Washington Post and ABC, 60 percent of all Americans strongly want the country to change direction. This comes naturally due to public perception of the evident challenges we are going through as being unnecessary, avoidable, or poorly executed – most notably the war in Iraq.
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