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Jamal Abdulahi runs for Congressional District 5

By Fedwa Wazwaz, Engage Minnesota

When two Somali-American Muslims compete for the same Congressional Seat, it is a measure of the healthy political growth of our community.

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Once upon a time, when a Muslim ran for office or Congress – they were up against a tornado of hatemongers, having to prove they are not tied to extremists and an opposing candidate who used their Muslim faith against them.

In Congressional District 5 (CD5), we have something new.  Minnesotans just love to lead in opening doors.  Congressman Keith Ellison who held this seat, left to run for Attorney General and a few candidates are running for CD5.

The excitement is we have two Somali-American Muslims competing with other candidates for this seat.

  • Jamal Abdulahi
  • Margaret Anderson Kelliher
  • Frank Nelson Drake
  • Ilhan Omar
  • Patricia Torres Ray

Wow!  This reminds me of when Norm Coleman and Paul Wellstone, both Jewish, ran for the same Senate Seat.  It is great to see more than one candidate running for the same seat.

Ilhan Omar, the nation’s first and only Somali-American lawmaker is running.

Jamal Abdulahi, a community activist, blogger, and the founder of Somali-American DFL Caucus officially launched his campaign to represent Minnesota’s 5th Congressional District as well.

Like many Somalis, Jamal’s story is a story of struggle, overcoming obstacles, working hard and giving back to the community he loves.

To learn more about Jamal Abdulahi’s campaign visit Jamal for Congress or join his Jamal for Congress Facebook Page.

Jamal shares that “on arriving in America, he took a Greyhound from California to Minnesota, worked minimum wage jobs to put himself through school and when he became eligible transferred to the University of Minnesota’s prestigious Institute of Technology and earned a degree in electrical engineering.

As committed DFL’er, Jamal has knocked on thousands of doors, chaired a committee charged with making recommendations on updating the DFL’s technology infrastructure and founded the Somali-American DFL Caucus which has taken as its mission to organize one of Minnesota’s most politically marginalized communities.

As a community advocate, Jamal has written extensively about the Somali community for mainstream publications and worked closely with legislators to draft legislation addressing gaps in mental health care, medical professionals trained overseas to be re-certified in Minnesota and a pilot program at Augsburg College to help inspire teachers of East African heritage to become licensed educators.

Jamal earned his M.B.A. while working full time and raising a family and developed his policy and leadership skills as a Policy Fellow at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey Institute.

Jamal and his wife Sahra Ali are raising four daughters and continue to serve the community just as Jamal has done his entire adult life.”

Try to engage all candidates and invite them to Somali and Muslim get-togethers to encourage more Muslims and Somalis to participate and vote.  I think the best way to advance the conversation when a Muslim or Somali runs, is to have more than one candidate running for the same seat.  This will highlight the issues they want to address instead of focusing mainly on responding to bigotry and Islamophobia.

Fedwa Wazwaz is a Palestinian-American born in Jerusalem, Palestine and raised in the US.  She was the chair for the Interfaith Relations at Islamic Center of Minnesota.  She has completed training in restorative justice at the University’s Center for Restorative Justice and Peacemaking.  She was a 2008-2009 policy fellow at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs.  She is a public speaker and writer and lives in Brooklyn Park, Minnesota.

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Tunisia’s revolution wasn’t televised

By Lolla Mohammed Nur, The Minnesota Daily

Two weeks ago, most University of Minnesota students were probably busy enjoying their long-awaited winter breaks and gripped by the tragic shooting in Arizona.

So it’s no surprise that most students didn’t hear about Tunisia’s revolution when it began brewing last month.

But had the first successful Arab revolt in the past generation occurred at any other time, we would have probably still missed it because of the small amount of media attention outside Arab and Francophone countries.

Read the rest of Lolla’s article here.

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