1,400-year-old advice still valuable for modern parents

Islam’s advice on raising minds, not just bodies By Rawan Hamade Evolution versus creation may be subject to debate in our world today, but there is no doubt that our understanding of certain institutions evolves with time. Our concept of family is just one example. I am not about to tell you that, back in the day, the family was what it ought to be and now divorce rates are increasing a hundredfold. That may be true, but only on the surface. Many sociologists tell us that marriage may have seemed holy long ago, but in fact family ties weren’t Read More …

Don’t define Muslim societies by their flaws

Fair criticism means looking beyond the faults and failings By Fedwa Wazwaz On October 22, The Minnesota Daily published my commentary “Islamo-Fascism a very racist concept.” On October 23 and 24, a couple of letters to the editor responded to my artcle. A common thread in the letters was the right to criticize Islam. Do people have a right to criticize Islam? Let me begin by quoting a couple of lines of Islamic poetry: “The eye of Love to every flaw is blind, While the eye of hatred reveals all flaws.”

Arabic not dangerous to America, but Arabic illiteracy dangerous to Muslims

This month, the Arabic language came under attack when Debbie Almontaser, principal of the Khalil Gibran International Academy, New York’s first public school that integrates Arabic language and cultural studies with a public school curriculum, explained that the English translation for the word “intifada,” literally means to “shake off.” Almontaser had been asked to explain a word on the T-shirts circulated by the AWAAM (Arab Women Active in the Arts and Media), a Brooklyn-based organization that empowers girls and women.

The attack on Khalil Gibran International Academy is one of the most recent examples of America’s fear of the Arabic language, but it is only one of numerous examples throughout the nation. In August 2006, JetBlue Airways refused to allow an Iraqi man to board a flight at Kennedy International Airport because he wore a t-shirt inscribed with Arabic and English. The phrase read, “We Will Not Be Silent.”