Category Archives: Tea Rozman Clark

Meet Ruhel Islam

By Tea Rozman-Clark, Green Card Voices

The best way to respond to extreme vetting, a term presidential candidate Donald Trump refers to in the debates is to amplify the voices of Muslim immigrants in their own words.

Upon the request of his sister, who was moving to the U.S. with her American-businessman husband, and due to the hostile political climate of his home country, Mr. Islam left Bangladesh for the U.S. in 1996.

The fourth of seven children, he moved from his rural, childhood village of Sylhet to a larger urban area in pursuit of a college degree in commerce and accounting. Upon the completion of his degree and while still in Bangladesh, he started a farm – growing it from just two chickens to over two thousand.

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Meet Zaynab Abdi

By Tea Rozman-Clark, Green Card Voices

Since arriving in the United States, Zaynab Abdi has set goals for herself. She wants to have the best future possible.

Zaynab was born in Aden, Yemen. She grew up in a large household with her extended family. Her mother immigrated to the United States through the Green Card Lottery when Zaynab was very young. After sixteen years, her mother was eligible to sponsor her for a visa, and Zaynab made plans to immigrate.

Before she could move, a revolution erupted in Yemen, disrupting her plans. She moved to Egypt with her sister. After two years, Zaynab’s visa arrived but not her sister’s; she would have to find another way. As another revolution began in Egypt, Zaynab went to Minnesota. It was difficult for Zaynab to adjust to life in the United States. Not only was she introduced to American culture, but she had to learn about her mother’s Somali culture as well. However, Zaynab was glad to be reunited with her mother.

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Meet Majra Mucic

By Tea Rozman-Clark, Green Card Voices

Majra Mucic.png
Majra Mucić never thought her childhood was out of the ordinary. Later, she realized not every child grew up waiting in line for food rations and hiding from air raids.

Ms. Mucić was born in Zenica, Bosnia in 1988—four years prior to the start of the Bosnian War. After the war, her family decided to immigrate and escape the economic and political tensions that remained. After an arduous screening process in a refugee camp, her family was paired with a host family in St. Louis Park, Minnesota.

Upon her arrival in 2001, Majra had a difficult time adjusting to the nuances of her new home. From the bus system to the grocery store, everything seemed so different. Life at school was just as tough; few children were willing to reach out to Majra. She eventually made friends over a mutual passion—sports.

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